BookEnds Bookstore

and other curiosities

Franco Maria Ricci

17 September 2013 by bookendsbookstore

Franco Maria Ricci was born on December 2, 1937 in Parma, Italy. He is an eminent publisher who is praised worldwide for his books. Critics call his magazine “the most beautiful magazine in the world.”

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“The Signs of Man is a rare and unusual collection of fine art books. These unique volumes are devoted to lost or forgotten masterpieces of art – the signs left by men of vision and genius – brilliantly captured in color images and examined in texts by renowned writers and scholars. Each volume is set in Bodoni type; the ridged, handmade paper, deckle-edged, has been specifically produced in the 700-year-old Fabriano mills; the color plates, exquisitely reproduced on superb paper, are hand tipped. Each volume is bound in black Orient silk, gold engraved, and presented in an elegant collector’s case. The format of the volumes is 9×13¾ inches. To ensure its value to collectors, “The Signs of Man” is printed in limited, numbered editions, never to be reprinted.” – FMR, No. 6

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BookEnds Bookstore offers a wide variety of exquisite volumes published by Franco Maria Ricci, including “The signs of man” series and Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini.

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All photos were of Arcimboldo, by Roland Barthes. 1980. The signs of man 7.

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Franklin Library

16 September 2013 by bookendsbookstore

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The Franklin Library of Philadelphia was established in 1973 and closed in 2000. The Franklin Press was the largest publisher and distributor of Public Domain books sold only to “Franklin Library Members of the First Edition Society.” These fine leather-bound books are accented in 22kt gold with gilded edges and cover designs, and have endsheets of moire fabric and smyth-sewing bindings.

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BookEnds Bookstore offers a unique selection of Franklin Library classic books, including mysteries, renowned works of literature by history’s great authors, signed first editions, and the limited edition “100 Greatest Books Of All Time,” published privately for the Oxford Library.

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Easton Press

13 September 2013 by bookendsbookstore

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Easton Press of Norwalk, Connecticut was established in the 1980′s. They published fine leather-bound books with 22kt gold stamped spine accents, exquisite cover designs, gilded page edges, endsheets of Moire silk, and Smyth-sewn binding. Easton Press books are hand crafted in America and have set the standard of printing excellence around the world.

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BookEnds Bookstore offers a unique selection of Easton Press books including renowned works of literature by history’s great authors, signed first editions and the works of Shakespeare.

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Roycroft

12 September 2013 by bookendsbookstore

Roycroft was a reformist community of artisans which formed part of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the USA during the early 20th century.

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Elbert Hubbard founded the community in 1895 in the village of East Aurora, New York. When Hubbard was unable to find a publisher for his book Little Journeys, he decided to set up his own private press to print the book himself, thus founding the Roycroft Press. The work and philosophy of the group, often referred to as the Roycroft Movement, had a strong influence on the development of American architecture and design in the early 20th century.

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His championing of the Arts and Crafts attracted a number of visiting artisans to East Aurora, where they formed a community of printers, furniture makers, metal smiths, and bookbinders. The community philosophy was quite simple. Working with the head, hand, and a playful heart makes every task pleasurable and brings health and happiness.

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In 1915 Hubbard and his wife, noted suffragette Alice Moore Hubbard, died in the sinking of RMS Lusitania. Without the founder, the Roycroft community went into gradual decline and closed.

The Elbert Hubbard books offered for sale range in price from $20 to $300.

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Bookends

12 September 2013 by bookendsbookstore

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Though you can’t judge a book by its cover, you can admire a home library for its books, cases, and bookends. This may be the dawn of e-readers, and yet for that very reason, the value of books is more cherished than ever before. As either a classic gift or the finishing touch to your home or office library, a vintage bookend set is more than just a weight or a placeholder. It is an invitation to peruse and a warm reminder of all the knowledge and pleasure that physical books can bring.

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At BookEnds Bookstore, we offer rare bookend sets that are each a unique piece of American history. Many of our metal and glass art bookends are listed in bookend collector’s guide books and continue to appreciate in value. The bookends we offer for sale are made by Armor Bronze, Blenko Glass, Bradley and Hubbard, J.B. Hirsch, Jennings Brothers, Judd, Roycroft, Syroco, and others.

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Uranium Glass

02 September 2013 by bookendsbookstore

Uranium Glass

Uranium glass fluoresces with a characteristic green light under ultraviolet (black light). It is often known as Vaseline glass because its appearance is like petroleum jelly. Simply put: uranium is added to glass before it is melted as a diurate oxide. Modern uranium glass is about 2%, in the 19th century some pieces contained as much as 25%. The glass comes in shades of yellow and green and a Geiger counter will register radioactivity on some objects.

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Uranium glass was once made into tableware and household items, but fell out of widespread use when the availability of uranium was curtailed during the Cold War from 1940s to 1990s; the majority of objects are now considered antiques or retro-era collectibles.

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Our collection offered for sale contains beautiful pieces made by well known artists such as Boyd, Fenton and Mosser.

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